Limiting the release of fat into the bloodstream during heart failure could help improve outcomes

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University of Alberta researchers have found that limiting the amount of fat the body releases into the bloodstream from fat cells during heart failure could help improve outcomes for patients.

In a recent study published in the American Journal of Physiology, Jason Dyck, professor of pediatrics in the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry and director of the U of A’s Cardiovascular Research Centre, found that mice with heart failure that were treated with a drug blocking the release of fat into the bloodstream from fat cells saw less inflammation in the heart and throughout the body, and had better outcomes than a control group.

“Many people believe that, by definition, heart failure is only a condition of the heart. But it’s much broader and multiple organs are affected by it,” said Dyck, who holds the Canada Research Chair in Molecular Medicine and is a member of the Alberta Diabetes Institute and the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute. “What we’ve shown in mice is that if you can target fat cells with a drug and limit their ability to release stored fat during heart failure, you can protect the heart and improve cardiac function.

“I think it really opens the door for other avenues of investigation and therapies for treating heart failure,” Dyck noted…

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