New surgical procedure reduces the rate of recurrent strokes among atherosclerotic patients

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A surgical procedure advanced and studied by vascular neurosurgeons at Cedars-Sinai dramatically reduced the rate of recurrent strokes among patients with atherosclerotic disease, a new study shows.

Atherosclerotic disease, also known as hardening of the arteries, is a buildup of plaque that narrows the arteries leading to the brain. The condition is known to increase patients’ risk of having a series of strokes.

Exciting new results from a Phase II clinical trial conducted at Cedars-Sinai demonstrated that a new procedure reduced recurrent stroke rates from 37% to 10.7%. Encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis, or EDAS for short, is a new procedure that was used and recently published in the journal Neurosurgery.

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“The EDAS procedure is unique in that it involves rerouting arteries from the scalp and membranes that cover the brain, to segments of the brain at risk of stroke,” said Nestor Gonzalez, MD, director of the Cedars-Sinai Neurovascular Laboratory. “Similar to gardening, over time, new blood vessels form and create a fresh path for blood oxygen to reach the brain.”

This gardening-like surgical technique differs from current, conventional approaches to reduce recurrent stroke, which include intensive medical management and various procedures, ranging from angioplasty and stenting to direct bypass surgery…

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