Rolling media coverage of missing persons cases can add to the trauma for all families left behind

rolling media coverage of missing persons cases can add to the trauma for all families left behind

Sumary of Rolling media coverage of missing persons cases can add to the trauma for all families left behind:

  • Reports suggested the yet-to-be-analysed fabric may be linked to the case of missing boy William Tyrrell.
  • William’s case – along with the location of Cleo Smith in Western Australia and recent developments in the case of missing campers Russell Hill and Carol Clay in Victoria – have been prominent news stories.
  • Media interest can invite the public into the investigative process.
  • But rolling media coverage can have an immediate and long-lasting effect on the families left behind.
  • That’s not only the families of that particular case, but the families of other missing people, whose case isn’t in the news.
  • Non-stop coverage can invade their privacy, raise and dash their hopes, and prolong their trauma.
  • More people go missing than ever make ‘news’ In 2020, Australia’s National Missing Persons Coordination Centre had more than 51,000 reports about the safety and well-being of a missing person.
  • Yet more than 2,600 cases are long term – when a person is missing for longer than three months.

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