The enzyme that could help curb chronic kidney disease

749750

Sumary of The enzyme that could help curb chronic kidney disease:

  • University of South Australia researchers have identified an enzyme that may help to curb chronic kidney disease, which affects approximately 700 million people worldwide..
  • This enzyme, NEDD4-2, is critical for kidney health, says UniSA Centre for Cancer Biology scientist Dr Jantina Manning in a new paper published this month in Cell Death &.
  • The early career researcher and her colleagues, including 2020 SA Scientist of the Year Professor Sharad Kumar, have shown in an animal study the correlation between a high salt diet, low levels of NEDD4-2 and advanced kidney disease..
  • While a high salt diet can exacerbate some forms of kidney disease, until now, researchers did not realise that NEDD4-2 plays a role in promoting this salt-induced kidney damage..
  • “We now know that both a high sodium diet and low NEDD4-2 levels promote renal disease progression, even in the absence of high blood pressure, which normally goes hand in hand with increased sodium,”.
  • NEDD4-2 regulates the pathway required for sodium reabsorption in the kidneys to ensure correct levels of salt are maintained..
  • Even people on a low salt diet can get kidney damage if they have low levels of NEDD4-2 due to genetic variations or mutations in the gene..
  • Prof Kumar says the long-term goal is to develop a drug that can increase NEDD4-2 levels in people with chronic kidney disease (CKD)..
  • “In a lot of cases, kidney disease is exacerbated by hypertension, so we wanted to investigate that link in our study..
  • In fact, we found the complete opposite — that a high salt diet caused excessive water loss and low blood pressure..
  • This is significant because it means that kidney disease can also happen in people who don’t have high blood pressure,”.
  • A 2020 Lancet paper estimated that about 700 million people — or 10 per cent of the world’s population — suffer from chronic kidney disease, which represents a 29 per cent increase in the past 30 years…

Want to know more click here go to source.

From -
Close
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content

Site Language


By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close