A key brain region responds to faces similarly in infants and adults

a key brain region responds to faces similarly in infants and adults

Sumary of A key brain region responds to faces similarly in infants and adults:

  • Within the visual cortex of the adult brain, a small region is specialized to respond to faces, while nearby regions show strong preferences for bodies or for scenes such as landscapes.
  • Neuroscientists have long hypothesized that it takes many years of visual experience for these areas to develop in children.
  • However, a new MIT study suggests that these regions form much earlier than previously thought.
  • In a study of babies ranging in age from two to nine months, the researchers identified areas of the infant visual cortex that already show strong preferences for either faces, bodies, or scenes, just as they do in adults.
  • Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the researchers collected usable data from more than 50 infants, a far greater number than any research lab has been able to scan before.
  • This allowed them to examine the infant visual cortex in a way that had not been possible until now.
  • “This is a result that’s going to make a lot of people have to really grapple with their understanding of the infant brain, the starting point of development, and development itself,” says Heather Kosakowski, an MIT graduate student and the lead author of the study, which appears today in Current Biology.
  • Distinctive regions More than 20 years ago, Nancy Kanwisher, the Walter A.

Want to know more click here go to source.

From -

Close

Site Language


By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close