Complexity index predicts medication doses in kids with severe neurological impairment

complexity index predicts medication doses in kids with severe neurological impairment

Sumary of Complexity index predicts medication doses in kids with severe neurological impairment:

  • September 10, 2021 2 min read Source/Disclosures Disclosures: Feinstein reports being chair of the State of Colorado Medicaid Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee.
  • Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
  • Back to Healio Children with severe neurological impairment who had higher scores on the Medication Regimen Complexity Index were more likely to receive many more doses of medications per day from their parents, according to a cross-sectional study.
  • “The Medication Regimen Complexity Index (MRCI) is a validated tool that assesses medication regimen complexity in adult and geriatric populations with polypharmacy, and it has the potential to be extrapolated to the pediatric population,” James A.
  • Feinstein, MD, MPH, of the Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science at the University of Colorado and Children’s Hospital Colorado, and colleagues wrote in JAMA Network Open.
  • “The MRCI score is intended to differentiate, for example, between a patient with lower complexity taking 10 medications, each as a single pill with once-daily dosing, and a patient with higher complexity taking 10 medications, but each with different dosage forms and requiring multiple doses per day.
  • The total MRCI score is composed of [three] sub-scores calculated from commonly available elements of patients’ medication prescriptions: dosage form, dose frequency and specialized instructions.
  • ” Source: Adobe Stock According to the researchers, MRCI scores can pinpoint adult patients most likely to benefit from pharmacist-led medication therapy management programs, and they may also help estimate subsequent health care utilization and adverse drug events.

Want to know more click here go to source.

From -

Close

Site Language


By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close