Researchers develop tool to drastically speed up the study of enzymes

researchers develop tool to drastically speed up the study of enzymes

Sumary of Researchers develop tool to drastically speed up the study of enzymes:

  • Scientists now understand that these transformations are powered by enzymes — protein molecules comprised of chains of amino acids that act to speed up, or catalyze, the conversion of one kind of molecule (substrates) into another (products).
  • “A chemical reaction that would take longer than the lifetime of the universe to happen on its own can occur in seconds with the aid of enzymes,” said Polly Fordyce, an assistant professor of bioengineering and of genetics at Stanford University.
  • While much is now known about enzymes, including their structures and the chemical groups they use to facilitate reactions, the details surrounding how their forms connect to their functions, and how they pull off their biochemical wizardry with such extraordinary speed and specificity are still not well understood.
  • Dubbed HT-MEK — short for High-Throughput Microfluidic Enzyme Kinetics — the technique can compress years of work into just a few weeks by enabling thousands of enzyme experiments to be performed simultaneously.
  • “Limits in our ability to do enough experiments have prevented us from truly dissecting and understanding enzymes,” said study co-leader Dan Herschlag, a professor of biochemistry at Stanford’s School of Medicine.
  • By allowing scientists to deeply probe beyond the small “active site” of an enzyme where substrate binding occurs, HT-MEK could reveal clues about how even the most distant parts of enzymes work together to achieve their remarkable reactivity.
  • “It’s like we’re now taking a flashlight and instead of just shining it on the active site we’re shining it over the entire enzyme,” Fordyce said.
  • ” Enzymatic tricks HT-MEK is designed to replace a laborious process for purifying enzymes that has traditionally involved engineering bacteria to produce a particular enzyme, growing them in large beakers, bursting open the microbes and then isolating the enzyme of interest from all the other unwanted cellular components.

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