COVID-19 vaccines cut the risk of serious illness or death — even if they aren’t perfect too …

covid 19 vaccines cut the risk of serious illness or death even if they arent perfect tools

Sumary of COVID-19 vaccines cut the risk of serious illness or death — even if they aren’t perfect tools:

  • This is an excerpt from Second Opinion, a weekly roundup of health and medical science news emailed to subscribers every Saturday morning.
  • A growing body of global data shows that leading COVID-19 vaccines significantly reduce your risk of falling seriously ill or dying if you wind up infected with the coronavirus.
  • That’s particularly the case when they’re used alongside other public health measures to prevent infections from happening in the first place — and even when faced with the hyper-contagious delta variant.
  • The latest Canadian data released on Friday shows that from late July to late August — while the more-contagious delta variant was circulating widely — unvaccinated individuals were 36 times more likely to be hospitalized for COVID-19 than those who were fully vaccinated.
  • South of the border, a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention featuring data from early April to mid-July showed that people who were not fully vaccinated were at least 10 times more likely to be hospitalized or die of COVID-19 than those who were fully vaccinated.
  • And in the U.K., the latest public health report shows that both the vaccinated and unvaccinated are getting infected — and infection rates in certain age groups are even higher among fully vaccinated individuals.
  • But when it comes to the COVID-19 death toll, that’s where things noticeably shift: Unvaccinated individuals had a significantly higher risk of dying after being infected with the virus than vaccinated individuals across every age category.
  • “It’s much harder right now, I think, to try and say that vaccines don’t work,” said Jason Kindrachuk, an assistant professor in medical microbiology and infectious diseases at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg.

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