NIH-funded study to test emergency treatment for devastating stroke in Memphis

nih funded study to test emergency treatment for devastating stroke in memphis

Sumary of NIH-funded study to test emergency treatment for devastating stroke in Memphis:

  • Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 19 2020 The University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s Stroke Team is joining researchers from more than 100 hospitals worldwide to conduct a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded research study called FASTEST that will test the safety and efficacy of a medication called recombinant factor Vlla to prevent hemorrhage expansion in patients with strokes caused by bleeding in the brain – intracerebral hemorrhage strokes..
  • The study’s local principal investigator is Anne Alexandrov, PhD, AG-ACNP-BC, RN, CCRN, ANVP-BC, NVRN-BC, FAAN, a professor in the UTHSC College of Nursing and chief nurse practitioner of the UTHSC Mobile Stroke Unit..
  • It produces the most devastating of all strokes, with more than 40 percent of patients dying within the first 30 days and only 20 percent of patients able to return to an independent life after six months, Dr. Alexandrov said..
  • Intracerebral hemorrhage accounts for about 10-15 percent of all stroke events nationally, according to the American Stroke Association..
  • In the Mid-South, almost 300 patients suffer this devastating form of stroke each year, according to UTHSC Stroke Team data..
  • The UTHSC FASTEST study aims to test whether factor VIIa, a drug that is currently FDA-approved to treat hemophilia, will stop hemorrhage expansion and therefore reduce the risk of death and worsening neurologic outcomes..
  • The Mobile Stroke Unit offers the unique opportunity to treat patients very early outside the hospital in the ambulance once they have undergone a brain CT scan and been diagnosed with an intracerebral hemorrhage..
  • At times when the Mobile Stroke Unit is not in service, patients who are diagnosed in the Methodist University Hospital Emergency Department with an intracerebral hemorrhage may also be enrolled in the study..
  • Dr. Anne Alexandrov, professor in the UTHSC College of Nursing and chief nurse practitioner of the UTHSC Mobile Stroke Unit Related Stories After this period of time, it is likely that the damage has been done and significant hemorrhage expansion has already occurred, so late arrival disqualifies patients for enrollment in the study, she said..
  • “Because patients with this type of stroke are often so disabled that they cannot understand information or even respond to questions, we will enroll them without consent if we are unable to find a legal next of kin to provide consent for them,”…

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