Scientists insist a woman’s fertility doesn’t always fall off a cliff after 35

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Sumary of Scientists insist a woman’s fertility doesn’t always fall off a cliff after 35:

  • One of the UK top fertility experts has hit out at older celebrity mothers who ‘mislead’ women into thinking having a baby in their 40s is easy..
  • In 2016, singer Janet Jackson announced she was pregnant just a few weeks before her 50th birthday, and gave birth to a healthy boy in January 2017..
  • But Dr Geeta Nargund, consultant gynaecologist at London St George Hospital and a fertility pioneer, has urged women not to delay starting a family in order to avoid a raft of age-related complications..
  • Women considering starting a family should be warned that their fertility will fall dramatically in their mid 30s Dr Geeta Nargund, consultant gynaecologist at London St George Hospital and a fertility pioneer, has urged women not to delay starting a family in order to avoid a raft of age-related complications Speaking to The Mail on Sunday Medical Minefield podcast, she says:.
  • ‘When celebrity mothers say they had a baby in their early 50s or late 40s, they need to spell out if, as is common in older women, they used a donor egg or frozen eggs..
  • Without that, women think it is easy for them to have babies in their mid-40s, and that is not true.’ Dr Nargund comments come amid a social-media campaign to scrap ‘offensive’ pregnancy terms which are commonly used by doctors to describe a mother in her least fertile years, such as ‘geriatric mother’ and ‘advanced maternal age’..
  • Such phrases had made them feel inadequate, anxious or irresponsible for getting pregnant after the age of 25, they wrote..
  • ‘Society has continued to use psychologically harmful terminology about and towards women at a time when they are, arguably, at their most vulnerable,’ said one woman, a doctor..
  • And with the average age of first-time mothers in England and Wales now at a record high of 30 – and creeping up year on year – some say that if the trend continues, the NHS could soon be flooded with pregnant women suffering age-related complications – not to mention the thousands who are left heartbroken, having realised they have left it too late to become mothers..
  • ‘It is not the language that is important, but the facts,’ says Dr Nargund, who has seen ‘too many patients’ in their 40s forced to endure the emotional turmoil of fertility treatment..
  • In 2015, Dr Nargund was accused of ‘scaremongering’ after writing a letter to the Government in which she demanded fertility education for teenagers and urged women to ‘start trying by the time they are 30’..
  • ‘When celebrity mothers say they had a baby in their early 50s or late 40s, they need to spell out if, as is common in older women, they used a donor egg or frozen eggs..
  • Without that, women think it is easy for them to have babies in their mid-40s, and that is not true’ According to recent studies, there are more fortysomething first-time mothers than ever before in the UK – four times as many as 20 years ago..
  • Dr Nick Raine-Fenning, consultant gynaecologist and associate professor of reproductive medicine at the University of Nottingham said the risks of women giving births in their 40s are overstated..
  • ‘The majority of women will have few, if any, complications even into their late 40s’ At 40, this drops to roughly one in 20 per cycle..
  • It was seen as uniquely reliable because the study was not skewed by birth control – many modern studies are thought to be complicated by women use of contraception throughout their lives, which could impact fertility..
  • It showed that 30 per cent of women over 35 who’d been trying for more than a year didn’t get pregnant, compared with less than 20 per cent of those in their late 20s and early 30s..
  • In 2004, US researchers studied more than 700 women in seven European countries and found 86 per cent of 27-34-year-olds conceived within a year, compared with 82 per cent of 35-to-39-year-olds..
  • ‘The majority of women will have few, if any, complications even into their late 40s,’ says Dr Nick Raine-Fenning, consultant gynaecologist and associate professor of reproductive medicine at the University of Nottingham..
  • Age boundaries mostly serve as a useful indicator for doctors, so they know when to do further tests for genetic conditions that we know are more likely as women age.’ Experts say there is good evidence that, as women get older, the risk of pregnancy complications increases..
  • Studies show that women over 40 are four times more likely than those in their early 30s to develop gestational diabetes, and are twice as likely to suffer pregnancy-induced high blood pressure..
  • Emergency caesarean sections are almost twice as likely in women over 40, compared with those younger, partly due to weaker muscles..
  • ‘Problems such as high blood pressure and pre-diabetes are much more common in older women to start with,’ he says..
  • ‘Pregnancy is a little bit like running on a treadmill for nine months, so naturally the women who are healthier and fit will suffer fewer complications..
  • ‘Generally, a woman who is fit and healthy aged 40 will likely do just as well – if not better – than someone who is half her age but overweight and with high blood pressure.’ Genetic conditions, such as Down syndrome and other developmental disorders, are a definite concern in older mothers, due to the chromosomal problems with older eggs…

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